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  • Casein vs. Whey: Is One Better than the Other?

    If there is one supplement that you simply cannot go without, it is protein powder.

    While it won't get you jacked up like a pre-workout, or increase your strength and power like creatine, it does provide your body with everything it needs to build new muscle tissue -- which makes it integral for athletes and weekend warriors alike.

    However, you can't just buy a simple “protein powder” and be done with it.

    See, there are several different types of protein powder that are all suggested to have their own unique pros and cons -- of which two of the most common are “casein” and “whey”.

    But what's the difference between these two options, and more importantly, is one better than the other?

    Casein and Whey Protein

    While they do have some key differences, the first thing I want to point out is that casein and whey protein also share some major similarities.

    Firstly, they are both derived from dairy milk. Secondly, they are both considered to be “complete protein” sources, which means that they provide your body with a full array of essential amino acids (i.e. the building blocks of your cells), rather than just a couple.

    So, how are they made?

    Dairy milk is made up of a number of different components. These include water, sugar (or lactose), several vitamins and minerals, and finally two very unique proteins -- which are obviously casein and whey protein.

    To keep it simple, casein is found within the solid part of milk, while whey is found in the liquid part.

    And how do we actually get the protein powder out of the milk?

    Well, it all comes down to cheese...

    When cheese is made, it starts off as dairy milk, before undergoing a number of unique production processes. During processing, the liquid component of the milk is separated from the solid to make it thicker, and then the thickest curds are fully extracted to stop it going lumpy.

    These curds are then washed and dried to create casein protein powder, while the watery component is filtered to extract the whey (which is also dried into a protein powder).

    Now, as I mentioned above, while they are indeed very similar, they also have some notable differences that influence when you might choose to take them.

    Casein vs. Whey: Nutritional Information

    The first major difference between casein and whey relates to their nutrient breakdown.

    Because casein is naturally thicker, it undergoes a less stringent filtration process than whey. This means that it typically contains a little less protein per gram than whey, in addition to a little more carbohydrate and fat.

    For example, the Amino Z micellar casein contains 81.5 grams of protein, 5 grams of carbohydrates, and 1.3 grams of fat, per 100 grams of protein powder.

    This is in stark contrast to the Amino Z whey protein isolate, which contains a whopping 90 grams of protein per 100 grams, for only 1.2 grams of carbohydrate and 1 gram of fat.

    This also means that casein contains more total calories than whey, which could influence your choice if you were in a cutting phase.

    Now, it is important to note that this doesn't have a huge impact when we are looking at the typical 30-40 gram serving size of most protein powders, but it does still need to be considered.

    Casein VS. Whey: Absorption

    Arguably the biggest difference between casein and whey protein powder is that they are absorbed at different rates after consumption.

    Like any protein source, both casein and whey are broken down into thousands of tiny little compounds called amino acids after consumption. These amino acids are then absorbed into your bloodstream, shuttled around your body, before eventually being used to create new tissue.

    But the rate at which this occurs is very different between casein and whey [1].

    Interestingly, when casein enters your digestive tract it interacts with your stomach acid to form curds. These curds are quite thick and clumpy, and subsequently take quite some time to break down and absorb.

    As a result, after consuming casein, you will slowly absorb amino acids for up to the next five hours.

    On the other hand we have whey.

    Because whey is much more refined than casein, it is broken down rapidly in your intestine, before being absorbed extremely quickly. In fact, it will only take about 90 minutes for all of the amino acids from whey to be absorbed and shuttled around your body.

    Which probably gives you a bit of insight into what type might be better when it comes to post-workout nutrition...

    Casein vs. Whey: Post workout nutrition

    Because whey protein is absorbed so quickly, it stands to reason that it is going to a better choice immediately post-workout -- but this is not the only reason.

    Whey protein also contains a higher number of branched chain amino acids than casein [1]. Branched chain amino acids are a group of three specific amino acids that play a primary role in the production of new muscle tissue.

    In fact, despite only being three of them (there are a total of 10 amino acids), they comprise about 35% of all the muscle tissue in your body -- which makes them pretty important for muscle growth.

    Therefore, because of these two distinct factors, whey has been shown to increase muscle protein synthesis (the production of new muscle tissue in your body) to a greater extent than casein [2].

    This means that it is more likely to contribute to muscle growth after exercise is completed.

    Casein vs. Whey: Night time nutrition

    Post workout nutrition is obviously important, but when it comes to optimizing muscle growth, your total daily protein intake is arguably the most important factor. Within this, you also want to make sure that you are evenly distributing your protein throughout the day [3].

    This keeps a constant stream of amino acids trickling into your body, ensuring that muscle protein stimulus is maximised throughout the day.

    With this in mind, consuming casein before bed is a great way to optimise muscle protein synthesis throughout the night's duration. While this is not the most important factor to eliciting muscle growth, it is an important step that can make a notable difference over time.

    This would suggest that despite not being optimal post workout, casein offers a unique benefit that whey cannot provide.

    Casein vs. Whey: Additional Benefits

    Lastly, both Casein and Whey contain several unique compounds that can have additional benefits to your general health and function.

    For starters, casein is full of unique bioactive peptides that have been shown to improve immune system function and digestive system health [4]. Within this, they also appear to help lower blood pressure, suggesting benefits to your cardiovascular health [5]

    On the other hand, whey protein contains several interesting proteins known as “immunoglobulins”.

    These immunoglobulins have been shown to have potent antimicrobial properties, in which they can kill off harmful bacteria and viruses. Consequently, they can boost your immune system function and make you less prone to illness [6].

    When considering each of these factors, it is not really a case of one being better than the other. Instead, it is simply acknowledging that both of these protein sources offer some unique benefits that sit outside the realm of muscle growth -- and therefore may both have a place in your supplement regime.

    Final Point

    And the winner is… BOTH.

    When it comes to casein and whey, they both have pros and cons that makes their use very context dependent.

    Whey is absorbed much faster than casein, where it also promotes a greater spike in muscle protein synthesis. This makes it a much better source of protein for your post-workout shakes. On the other hand, because of its slow digestion, casein is a great option to take before bed so you can keep protein synthesis high throughout the night.

    So, if you want to maximize your results, it might be worth opting for both.

     

    References

    1. Dangin, Martial, et al. "Influence of the protein digestion rate on protein turnover in young and elderly subjects." The Journal of nutrition 132.10 (2002): 3228S-3233S.
    2. West, Daniel WD, et al. "Rapid aminoacidemia enhances myofibrillar protein synthesis and anabolic intramuscular signaling responses after resistance exercise–." The American journal of clinical nutrition 94.3 (2011): 795-803.
    3. Stokes, Tanner, et al. "Recent perspectives regarding the role of dietary protein for the promotion of muscle hypertrophy with resistance exercise training." Nutrients 10.2 (2018): 180.
    4. Mohanty, D. P., et al. "Milk derived bioactive peptides and their impact on human health–A review." Saudi journal of biological sciences 23.5 (2016): 577-583.
    5. Fekete, Ágnes A., D. Ian Givens, and Julie A. Lovegrove. "Casein-derived lactotripeptides reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials." Nutrients 7.1 (2015): 659-681.
    6. Ng, Tzi Bun, et al. "Antiviral activities of whey proteins." Applied microbiology and biotechnology 99.17 (2015): 6997-7008.
  • WPI vs. WPC: What you need to know

    Protein supplements are some of the most beneficial on the planet. While they may not be ‘sexy’ like pre-workouts and creatine, they are arguably more important.

    See, every time you train in the gym you place your body under stress. And this stress tells your body that it needs to build more muscle tissue to ensure that it can better tolerate that stress in the future.

    And what is required to build that new muscle?

    Bingo -- protein.

    In short, if you don't have enough protein in your system to facilitate the development of new muscle tissue, your muscle growth becomes impaired. Which is why you want to make sure you have adequate protein available at all times.

    Which explains why protein supplements are so useful.

    When it comes to supplementing with protein, there are two options that stand above the rest -- Whey Protein Isolate and Whey Protein Concentrate.

    What is Whey Protein?

    What in the world is whey protein?

    First and foremost, whey is a specific part of dairy milk.

    Dairy milk is made up of several individual components, including water, carbohydrates, a multitude of vitamins and minerals, and two distinct proteins -- which are known as casein and whey protein.

    Casein is found in the solid components of milk, whereas whey is found in the liquid components.

    With all this in mind, when people make cheese, the liquid component of the milk is separated from the solid to make it thicker. This watery component is then filtered to extract the whey.

    While whey was once considered a useless byproduct, it is now purified and dried to form a powder.

    And this powder is what we now call whey protein.

    Why Whey Protein?

    The main reason that whey protein has become the most popular type of protein powder is because it is considered a complete protein.

    It is considered complete because it provides you with all nine essential amino acids (which cannot be made in your body and therefore must be obtained through diet), including the three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs): leucine, isoleucine and valine.

    This ultimately means that it provides your body with everything it needs to build new muscle.

    Whey Protein Isolate VS. Whey Protein Concentrate

    Once whey has been separated from the rest of the milk, it can be refined and processed in a number of different ways, each resulting in a slightly different type of protein powder.

    However, the two most common are Whey protein Isolate (WPI for short) and Whey Protein Concentrate (or WPC).

    But what's the difference, and more importantly, is one better than the other?

    1.    Nutrient Breakdown

    WPI undergoes a more serious process of filtration than WPC. This means that it contains less carbohydrates, less fat, and more protein per serving. In fact, if you were to look at the Amino Z branded WPI and WPC, this becomes apparent.

    Our WPI contains a whopping 90 grams of protein per 100 grams, for only 1.2 grams of carbohydrate and 1 gram of fat.  On the other hand, our WPC contains 80 grams of protein, 6 grams of fat, and 7 grams of carbohydrates (again, per 100 grams).

    While this does not make a huge difference when you are looking at the typical 30-40 gram serving size of protein powder, over time it can start to add up.

    2.    Digestibility

    As I alluded to above, WPI is more refined than WPC. This means that it is absorbed a little bit faster than WPC. But even though this may sound like a big deal, it doesn't appear to have a huge difference when it comes to real-world outcomes.

    In fact, both WPI and WPC are absorbed in less than an hour after consumption. As a result, they have similar effects on muscle protein synthesis, and consequently, similar effects on muscle growth [1].

    Although one notable difference that does need to be considered when discussing the digestibility of these two supplements is related to lactose.

    WPC contains a lot more lactose than WPI.

    As a result, WPI is probably a much better choice for people who are lactose intolerant, or find themselves getting digestive issues after consuming large amounts of dairy [2].

    3.    Price

    Finally, onto the big one -- price.

    Because WPC is much easier to make than WPI, it is noticeably cheaper. It is for this reason a kilogram of our WPI will set you back $34.95, while a kilogram of our WPC only costs $29.95.

    This means that if you are a little bit short on cash, WPC might be a better option for you.

    Take Home Points

    I would argue that 99% of people in the gym should be taking a protein supplement. It ultimately ensures that you have enough protein available to maximise recovery, boosting muscle growth in the process.

    However, when it comes to choosing what type of protein supplement to take, it can get a little tricky.

    WPI contains more protein than WPC on a per serving basis, in conjunction with less fat, less carbohydrates, and a lot less lactose. However, this is reflected in its price, where it is a little more expensive.

    In essence, if you are sensitive to lactose, WPI is a must. If you are short on cash, then WPC is probably the better option.

    And if you fit neither of those categories?

    Go with whatever one you feel is best for you!

    References

    1. Hulmi, Juha J., Christopher M. Lockwood, and Jeffrey R. Stout. "Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein." Nutrition & metabolism 7.1 (2010): 51.
    2. Hoffman, Jay R., and Michael J. Falvo. "Protein–which is best?." Journal of sports science & medicine 3.3 (2004): 118.
  • Ghost Whey Review

    The Ghost Brand is an up and coming supplement line that is gaining quite a lot of traction, earning coveted word of mouth referrals from those that use their products. Even though at first glance Ghost Whey might appear as if it is just a basic Whey protein powder, it actually has a few tricks up its sleeve.

    Wondering how this iteration of the Ghost family will fare? Let's check it out now.

    Taste

    One thing the Ghost brand has completed nailed, as is evident in Ghost Whey as well, is the taste factor. Ghost Whey comes in several delicious flavours, including cereal milk, fruity cereal milk, blueberry toaster pastry, milk chocolate, peanut butter cereal milk and coffee ice cream.

    There is something in Ghost Whey that brings about a nostalgic feeling after drinking a serve, which is especially true if you recall having cereal in milk as a kid and then drinking the milk left in the bowl. This is the truest explanation of what cereal milk is, and one that you are bound to love.

    The non-cereal milk flavours also taste exceptional, though if you dislike the taste of coffee you may not love the coffee ice cream flavour. But that's not to say it's bad in the least. Overall, Ghost Whey has at least one flavour you are bound to love.

    Taste: 5/5

    Solubility/Texture

    Ghost Whey does an excellent job of mixing in water, as is the standard we have come to expect from all Whey-based proteins. It is instantized, so whether you choose to whip up a batch in a shaker bottle, blender or just with a spoon, you should not encounter difficulties with the process.

    You can mix up to two serves in 360ml of water, being sure to vigorously mix throughout. You can still modify the amount of water you use to achieve the consistency and texture you desire prior to consumption.

    Solubility/Texture: 5/5

    Nutritional Breakdown

    Ghost Whey does not need to reinvent the wheel. It is well known that Whey protein is the gold standard when it comes with getting high quality amino acids in your diet, in a fast and convenient form, but what they have done is combine three extremely popular forms of this protein; namely the concentrate, isolate and hydrolysate, so that you can take advantage of the unique offerings of each.

    Consumption of a Whey protein supplement, especially in the post workout window helps to promote muscle protein synthesis thanks to its stimulating effect on the anabolic hormone insulin [1]. Insulin is critical for helping to shuttle glucose and amino acids into muscle cells, which after a training session are primed to absorb much-needed nutrients.

    In addition to this, the branched-chain amino acid leucine [2] plays a critical role in stimulating anabolism and protein synthesis at the genetic and cellular level, so that your efforts in the gym do not go to waste. This is why many protein supplements proudly trumpet their BCAA content on the label. As an added bonus, consumption of high amounts of BCAAs can help with the loss of abdominal fat when on a hypocaloric diet, compared to diets which are low in BCAAs [3].

    Lastly, but certainly not least is Whey protein's speed of absorption. As a whole, Whey proteins are absorbed rapidly, but as purity goes up (concentrate<isolate<hydrolysate) so too does it speed of absorption. While the difference in actual protein content between the concentrate and hydrolysate form isn't that significant, the hydrolysate form has been partially broken down into amino acid components, so that it enters blood even faster and leads to higher blood amino acids[4] (and greater muscle growth!)

    Ghost Whey can help you take advantage of your entire workout window if consumed before and after your session. In addition to the actual training session, you may also consume Ghost Whey immediately upon waking in the morning, or before bed (both optional).

    The Ghost Whey label also makes reference to enzymes, though there is no specific mention of which. However, based on the fact that it is a protein supplement, it is most likely some form of proteolytic enzymes (to speed up cleavage of the amino acid bonds).

    Value For Money

    When it comes down to the cost per serve, Ghost Whey may seem a tad bit expensive. A jar supplying 28 serves costs about $68.95, which equates to almost $2.50 per scoop. However, you need to keep in mind that Ghost Whey is not simply one type of Whey protein, but actually three blended peptides combined into one product.

    By including the concentrate, isolate and hydrolysate you are able to experience different rates of protein absorption, especially when taking around the peri- workout window. Even at 25 g of protein per serve, however, Ghost Whey still remains one of the more expensive Whey protein products on the market. This is the price you pay for good things.

    Value: 3/5

    Conclusion

    Ghost Whey is on its 'Whey' up, with the brand as a whole developing a stellar reputation after being used. The blended approach that Ghost Whey employs is a great idea as smaller differences in absorption speed and purity can make a difference in you gaining every ounce of muscle you deserve.

    Our only hope (and negative) is that Ghost make their Whey protein available in 5 pound jars, since this would most likely bring down the individual cost per serve and make it more justifiable spending your cash on it.

    Overall, a great product with great taste and mixability, but at a higher cost per scoop.

    Overall: 4/5

    References

    1.Tsutsumi R, Tsutsumi YM. Peptides and proteins in Whey and their benefits for human health. Austin J Nutri Food Sci 2014;1(1): 1002

    2.Norton, Layne, Layman, Donald. Leucine Regulates Translation Initiation of Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle after Exercise. J. Nutr. February 2006 vol. 136 no. 2 533S-537S.

    3.Mourier A, Bigard AX, de Kerviler E, Roger B, Legrand H, Guezennec CY.Combined effects of caloric restriction and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on body composition and exercise performance in elite wrestlers.Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jan;18(1):47-55.

    4.Manninen AH.Hyperinsulinaemia, hyperaminoacidaemia and post-exercise muscle anabolism: the search for the optimal recovery drink. Br J Sports Med. 2006 Nov; 40(11):900-5.

  • BSN Syntha 6 vs. Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein

    What is BSN Syntha 6?

    Syntha 6 is one of the most popular protein supplements from BSN. Having a noticeably higher than average caloric content, Syntha 6 is an ideal supplement for several fitness goals including lean mass gains and weight loss meal replacement.

     

    Highlights:

    • 22 grams of protein per serving
    • Offers a variety of protein types for varying speeds of protein digestion (Whey Protein Concentrate, Whey Protein Isolate, Calcium Caseinate, Micellar Casein, Milk Protein Isolate, Egg Albumin, And Glutamine Peptides)
    • Also includes fatty acids, fibre, and carbohydrates

     

    Why You Should Use BSN Syntha 6

    Syntha 6 is an ideal protein supplement for anyone who wants to pack on solid lean muscle mass and has no restrictions on carbohydrates in their diet. You'll immediately notice that Syntha 6 has 200 calories per serving and this number is higher than most other protein supplements including Optimum Nutrition Casein Protein, which only has 120 calories.

     

    These extra calories are coming from a combination of protein, fatty acids, and complex carbohydrates, making this ideal as a lean mass gainer or someone who wants to pack on muscle and minimize fat gain. Syntha 6 is also a great option for meal replacement when your goal is weight loss.

     

    Syntha 6 utilizes a protein matrix, which consists of several types of protein sources. This is excellent for ensuring amino acid release over the course of several hours. Amino acids are the building blocks of muscle tissue and promote protein synthesis, lean mass growth, and recovery. (1-6)

     

    Casein from Optimum Nutrition also offers an extended amino acid release; however, Syntha 6 provides an immediate supply of aminos from whey isolate. Casein, on the other hand, takes more time to start breaking down.

     

    Things to Watch Out for With BSN Syntha 6

    If you are on a low-carbohydrate diet, Syntha 6 may interfere with that as it contains 15 grams of carbohydrates per serving.

     

    The only other issue with BSN Syntha 6 would be nutritional preferences. If you are someone who wants to avoid artificial flavouring, fillers, and sweeteners at all cost, then Syntha 6 may pose a problem as it contains all of these things. Then again, you'll be hard pressed to find a supplement in this industry that doesn't contain those things. Even Optimum Nutrition Casein has artificial sweeteners; however, it has less additives than Syntha 6.

     

     

    What is Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein?

    Optimum Nutrition Casein is a leading brand of casein protein, primarily used by those who want to protect muscle mass and support its growth. O.N. Casein can also be useful for anyone who is looking to curb their appetite and support a healthy weight loss due to its slow digestion rate.

     

    Highlights:

    • Provides 24 grams of protein
    • Ideal for low carbohydrate diets with only 3 grams per serving – With the 1 gram of fiber, the net carb content would only be 2 grams per serving
    • Slowest rate of digestion, which allows for extended release of muscle building amino acids

    Why You Should Use Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein

    Once exclusively used by bodybuilders, casein protein has become a fitness staple for those who are muscle-focused. Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein is a unique supplement in that it is designed to take hours to digest. This means that the amino acids that you need for muscle maintenance and growth are going to be released over the course of several hours as opposed to one quick shot like with an isolate.

     

    The 120-calorie serving makes O.N. Casein ideal for muscle building especially for those on a low carb diet.

     

    Things to Watch Out for With Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein

    Due to the extremely slow digestion rate, Optimum Nutrition 100% Casein Gold Standard Protein would not be a great choice for immediate post-workout nutrition. BSN Syntha 6 features whey isolate in its protein matrix, making it the better choice for an immediate post-workout shake.

     

    Conclusion

    Both of these protein brands are excellent choices for muscle building and weight loss. It is not a question of quality, as they are both of elite equality; rather, it is a question of nutritional timing.

     

    BSN Syntha 6 can be used at any point throughout the day; however, we wouldn't recommend using it at night because of the higher caloric content. In this case, Optimum Nutrition Casein would be the better choice. It will release amino acids throughout the night and it only has 120 calories per serving, helping you to promote muscle growth and avoid fat gain.

     

    If you're serious about your fitness goals, you can use both of these supplements to support your results.

     

    References

    1. Tsutsumi R, Tsutsumi YM. Peptides and proteins in whey and their benefits for human health. Austin J Nutri Food Sci 2014;1(1): 1002
    1. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.
    1. Norton, Layne, Layman, Donald. Leucine Regulates Translation Initiation of Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle after Exercise. J. Nutr. February 2006 vol. 136 no. 2 533S-537S.
    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.
    1. Mourier A, Bigard AX, de Kerviler E, Roger B, Legrand H, Guezennec CY. Combined effects of caloric restriction and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on body composition and exercise performance in elite wrestlers. Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jan;18(1):47-55.
    1. De Lorenzo A, Petroni ML, Masala S, Melchiorri G, Pietrantuono M, Perriello G, Andreoli A. Effect of acute and chronic branched-chain amino acids on energy metabolism and muscle performance. Diabetes Nutr Metab. 2003 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):291-7.
  • Dymatize ISO 100 vs. EHP Labs OxyWhey

    What is Dymatize ISO 100?

    Dymatize ISO 100 is an advanced protein supplement that focuses on the fastest digesting forms of protein: hydrolysed whey and whey isolate protein. The focus on these two types of protein makes it an ideal post-workout supplement whereas EHP Labs OxyWhey is an all-around great protein choice, suitable for meal replacement and pre-workout.

     

    Highlights:

    • 25 grams of protein per serving (OxyWhey is comparable at 24 grams of protein)
    • Barebones formula – You are getting protein with few additional ingredients
    • Fastest rate of digestion for any protein source
    • Scores 101 out of 100 on the bioavailability scale

     

    Why You Should Use Dymatize ISO 100

    Dymatize ISO 100 is an isolate-based protein supplement that focuses on getting your muscles the amino acids they need for repair and recovery.

     

    One of the best things about Dymatize ISO 100 is the fast rate of digestion and the perfect bioavailability score. A protein source that digests extremely fast AND is almost completely bioavailable with minimal waste is a powerful weapon for post-workout nutrition.

     

    EHP Labs OxyWhey, on the other hand, is a protein blend. This doesn't mean it's a bad post-workout choice; rather, it can be better utilized at different times. It has several sources of protein, meaning extended amino acid release. This is great for promoting a longer anabolic environment but not as useful when your muscles needed an immediate supply of amino acids post-workout.

     

    Things to Watch Out for With Dymatize ISO 100

    Aside from artificial flavouring and artificial sweeteners, there isn't much to be cautious of with Dymatize ISO 100. As mentioned above, Dymatize ISO 100 is ideal for post-workout supplementation. You can also use it to kickstart your day with a rapid boost of protein after the 8 to 12 hours you spend fasting each night.

     

    If you're looking for a protein supplement that can support a longer period of amino acid delivery, a protein blend, like EHP Labs OxyWhey, may be the better choice.

     

     

    What is EHP Labs OxyWhey?

    OxyWhey by EHP Labs is a protein blend that also features a fat burning formula. It is a combination of isolate, concentrate, and casein protein. These three types of protein offer three varying rates of digestion, which is important for promoting an environment of repair and growth for a longer period of time.

     

    Highlights:

    • Provides 24 grams of highly bioavailable protein - While it may have a high bioavailability score, it cannot compare with the digestibility of ISO 100
    • Features several fat-burning ingredients such as Green Tea Extract and Chromium Picolinate

     

    Why You Should Use EHP Labs OxyWhey

    OxyWhey is an excellent protein supplement that features a higher-than-average protein amount per serving, a unique protein blend, and a thermogenic blend. If you are looking for a way to add in extra protein to your diet WHILE you support fat burning, OxyWhey is the ideal supplement for you.

     

    When it comes to supplement timing, it's important to understand that OxyWhey is going to qualify for nearly every occasion that you can think of with the exception of post-workout nutrition. While you can use it as a post-workout supplement; however, it wouldn't perform as well as ISO 100.

     

    Things to Watch Out for With EHP Labs OxyWhey

    It's also important to realize that OxyWhey is a protein supplement and NOT a fat burner. Despite the thermogenic compounds within, OxyWhey does not contain the needed dosages of those fat burners to make a real impact. It's great support but not dosed at a level that would promote high level fat burning benefits.

     

    Conclusion

    ISO 100 is designed to be the perfect post-workout protein source. OxyWhey isn't bad; it's just not as great as ISO 100 solely for the post-workout time period. With that said, OxyWhey is ideal for literally any other point during the day or night.

     

    We would recommend using both proteins. Use ISO 100 to break your morning fast and for post-workout nutrition. Use OxyWhey as a morning snack, pre-workout, or afternoon snack. Together, these two protein supplements will make a huge impact in your results.

     

    References

    1. Tsutsumi R, Tsutsumi YM. Peptides and proteins in whey and their benefits for human health. Austin J Nutri Food Sci 2014;1(1): 1002

     

    1. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.

     

    1. Norton, Layne, Layman, Donald. Leucine Regulates Translation Initiation of Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle after Exercise. J. Nutr. February 2006 vol. 136 no. 2 533S-537S.

     

    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.

     

    1. Mourier A, Bigard AX, de Kerviler E, Roger B, Legrand H, Guezennec CY. Combined effects of caloric restriction and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on body composition and exercise performance in elite wrestlers. Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jan;18(1):47-55.

     

    1. De Lorenzo A, Petroni ML, Masala S, Melchiorri G, Pietrantuono M, Perriello G, Andreoli A. Effect of acute and chronic branched-chain amino acids on energy metabolism and muscle performance. Diabetes Nutr Metab. 2003 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):291-7.
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