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  • Achieve Your 2018 Goals with L-Arginine, Protein, and Creatine

    The New Year is approaching fast and it’s right about now that resolutions and goals are being made for 2018. Losing weight and building muscle are the most popular goals each year and while the foundation of these goals is built around nutrition and exercise, supplements can dramatically increase your chances for success. Three supplement ingredients in particular, L-arginine, whey protein, and creatine, can help you achieve your fitness goals.

     

    What is L-Arginine?

    L-Arginine, a non-essential amino acid, has a variety of duties in the body, including assisting with protein production and utilization.

     

    Benefits of L-Arginine

    L-Arginine is an ideal pre-workout ingredient to use as it can support several fitness benefits including performance, weight loss, and muscle building. Studies suggest that L-arginine can support the following:

     

    • May enhance exercise performance via increased nitric oxide production
    • May promote muscle building through increased work output
    • May support post-workout recovery by reducing inflammation and alleviating soreness

     

    How Can L-Arginine Help You Achieve Your Fitness Goals?

    Studies show that L-arginine is a potent nitric oxide booster, which may help with increasing performance. Better performance may equate to being able to achieve specific acute variables for muscle building, performance enhancement, or fat loss. What’s more, L-arginine can support post-workout recovery to get you back in the gym faster.

     

    Create your very own supplement for 2018 by using the Amino Z Supplement Builder. Providing you with only scientifically proven ingredients, the Amino Z Supplement Builder lets you choose which ingredients to use and the dosage of each.

     

    What is Whey Protein?

    Whey protein has become a staple in most homes for muscle building or meal replacement. Whey protein can come in concentrate or isolate form. It provides the amino acids you need to support a variety of fitness goals.

     

    Benefits of Whey Protein

    Countless studies have been focused on whey protein and it has applicable benefits inside and outside the fitness world. Studies show that whey protein can be used for the following benefits:

     

    • May promote lean muscle growth via increasing the anabolic environment inside the body and boosting protein synthesis
    • May enhance post-workout recovery by providing muscle repairing amino acids
    • May ensure healthy weight management as a health meal replacement option

     

    How Can Whey Protein Help You Achieve Your Fitness Goals?

    If you want to build muscle, whey protein is a necessity. It contains amino acids, which have been shown to promote anabolism and muscle growth. Whey protein is also an ideal supplement for performance athletes as it may help with recovery and gains. Those looking to lose weight can use it as a meal replacement.

     

    What is Creatine?

    Creatine has been used just as long as whey protein and it’s considered one of the veterans of the industry. This amino acid by-product provides the muscle tissue with a direct form of usable energy called adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

     

    Benefits of Creatine

    The newest forms of creatine are rapidly absorbed by the body and provide a number of scientifically validated benefits including:

     

    • Converts into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which may increase energy levels and force output
    • May be able to increase intra-workout strength levels – In turn, this may help to promote muscular hypertrophy
    • May support post-workout recovery

     

    How Can Creatine Help You Achieve Your Fitness Goals?

    Once converted, creatine provides the preferred form of energy for muscle tissue. This can dramatically enhance your intra-workout or competition performance. It’s also going to be a key factor in your recovery and how quickly you get yourself back into the gym.

     

    Make sure that 2018 if your year for fitness success. Try the Amino Z Supplement Builder today!

     

    References

    1. K. Hnia, J. Gayraud, G. Hugon, M. Ramonatxo, S. De La Porte, S. Matecki, et al. L-Arginine Decreases Inflammation and Modulates The Nuclear Factor-?b/Matrix Metalloproteinase Cascade In Mdx Muscle Fibers. Am J Pathol, 172 (6) (2008), pp. 1509-1519.

     

    1. B.I. Campbell, P.M. La Bounty, M. Roberts. The Ergogenic Potential of Arginine. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 1 (2) (2004), pp. 35-38.

     

    1. Tsutsumi R, Tsutsumi YM. Peptides and proteins in whey and their benefits for human health. Austin J Nutri Food Sci 2014;1(1): 1002.

     

    1. Phillips, S. M., and L. J. Van. "Dietary Protein for Athletes: From Requirements to Optimum Adaptation." Journal of Sports Sciences. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2011. Web.

     

    1. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan; 136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.

     

    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.

     

    1. De Lorenzo A, Petroni ML, Masala S, Melchiorri G, Pietrantuono M, Perriello G, Andreoli A. Effect of acute and chronic branched-chain amino acids on energy metabolism and muscle performance. Diabetes Nutr Metab. 2003 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):291-7.

     

    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.

     

    1. Robert Cooper, Fernando Naclerio, Judith Allgrove, and Alfonso Jimenez. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012; 9: 33. Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-33.
  • Pair Creatine with These 4 Supplement Ingredients

    Creatine monohydrate is one of the classic fitness supplements. Long before you had shelves lined with hundreds of options, creatine was one of the only options available. The fact that it’s still widely used within the industry speaks to how effective it is.

     

    Modern supplement research has shown creatine’s ability to support intra-workout performance, boost muscle building, and enhance recovery. Studies have also revealed a variety of useful ingredients outside of creatine that can support your fitness goals. What’s more, some of these ingredients work best when paired together. (1-2)

     

    Let’s take a look at the top 4 ingredients to combine with creatine to maximize fitness performance and physique goals.

     

    Beta Alanine

    Famous for that flushed and tingling feeling you get from taking it, beta alanine is found within most pre, intra, and post-workout supplements today.

     

    Studies suggest that supplementation with beta alanine can dramatically improve intra-workout performance. What’s more, it supports your recovery and muscle building while increasing carnosine levels.

     

    Creatine is broken down into adenosine triphosphate, which is the preferred fuel source for muscle mass. Combining this with beta alanine, you have an intra-workout duo that is sure to enhance performance and results. (1-6)

     

    Glutamine

    Glutamine is an amino acid that has been a staple of recovery and muscle building for years now. Glutamine may be able to alleviate the inflammation and soreness you feel post-workout. This is useful as you’ll be able to get back into the gym faster with less pain.

     

    What’s more, glutamine helps to protect your lean muscle tissue from breaking down due to a calorie restricted diet or over training. (7-9)

     

    Pairing glutamine with creatine provides your muscles with the fuel they need to perform while offering an elite level of protection from catabolism and soreness.

     

    Looking for the ideal creatine and glutamine supplement? Make your own with the Amino Z Supplement Builder! You control the ingredients and the dosage while using on the highest quality supplements. Try it today!

     

    Caffeine

    Caffeine is another ingredient that has become extremely popular within the fitness world. Most people rely on caffeine to start their day so it should come as no surprise that caffeine’s energy boosting benefits have become commonplace in fitness.

     

    Caffeine can do more than boost your energy levels. Studies suggest that caffeine can help boost your performance and alleviate post-workout soreness. (10-11)

     

    Combining caffeine with creatine is an obvious thing to do. Caffeine boosts your energy while creatine supplies muscle tissue with usable fuel. It’s a winning combination.

     

    AAKG

    Arginine Alpha-Ketoglutarate is a super charged version of L-Arginine and it’s incredibly effective for any fitness enthusiast looking to boost workout performance with an emphasis on nitric oxide levels.

     

    Higher N.O. levels have been shown to promote that classic pumped feeling of tight muscles while lifting. AAKG has been shown in studies to support intra-workout performance while aiding in lean muscle growth. (12-14)

     

    AAKG is an obvious choice to pair with creatine. It supports your workout performance while promoting higher levels of nitric oxide for better pumps. Combine this creatine as a fuel source and you’re sure to see an improvement during your workouts.

     

    Make Your Own Creatine Supplement

    If you want to invest in a supplement that can support your fitness performance and results, why leave it to chance that you’ll find the ideal supplement? You can make your very own supplement creatine with the Amino Z Supplement Builder.

     

    You control which high quality ingredients go in to your masterpiece. Follow our guidelines above or add ingredients to your liking. You’re in control! Try the Amino Z Supplement Builder today!

     

     

    References

    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.

     

    1. Robert Cooper, Fernando Naclerio, Judith Allgrove, and Alfonso Jimenez. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012; 9: 33. Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-33.

     

    1. Hobson RM, Saunders B, Ball G, Harris RC, Sale C. Effects of ?-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis. Amino Acids. 2012 Jul;43(1):25-37. doi: 10.1007/s00726-011-1200-z. Epub 2012 Jan 24.

     

    1. Artioli GG, Gualano B, Smith A, Stout J, Lancha AH Jr. Role of beta-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine and exercise performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Jun;42(6):1162-73. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181c74e38.

     

    1. Saunders B, DE Salles Painelli V, DE Oliveira LF, DA Eira Silva V, DA Silva RP, Riani L, Franchi M, Gonçalves LS, Harris RC, Roschel H, Artioli GG, Sale C, Gualano B. Twenty-four Weeks of ?-Alanine Supplementation on Carnosine Content, Related Genes, and Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017 May;49(5):896-906. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001173.

     

    1. Hoffman J, Ratamess N, Kang J, Mangine G, Faigenbaum A, Stout J. Effect of creatine and beta-alanine supplementation on performance and endocrine responses in strength/power athletes. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Aug;16(4):430-46.

     

    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.

     

    1. Piattoly, Tavis. L-glutamine supplementation: effects on recovery from Exercise. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College. (4 – 9) August 2005.

     

    1. Calder PC, Yaqoob P. Glutamine and the immune system. Amino Acids. 1999;17(3):227-41.

     

    1. Costill DL, Dalsky GP, Fink WJ. Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports [1978, 10(3):155-158].

     

    1. Kennedy DO, Haskell CF, Wesnes KA, Scholey AB. Improved cognitive performance in human volunteers following administration of guarana (Paullinia cupana) extract: comparison and interaction with Panax ginseng. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2004 Nov;79(3):401-11.

     

    1. Willoughby DS, Boucher T, Reid J, Skelton G, Clark M. Effects of 7 days of arginine-alpha-ketoglutarate supplementation on blood flow, plasma L-arginine, nitric oxide metabolites, and asymmetric dimethyl arginine after resistance exercise. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2011 Aug;21(4):291-9.

     

    1. K. Hnia, J. Gayraud, G. Hugon, M. Ramonatxo, S. De La Porte, S. Matecki, et al. L-Arginine Decreases Inflammation and Modulates The Nuclear Factor-?b/Matrix Metalloproteinase Cascade In Mdx Muscle Fibers. Am J Pathol, 172 (6) (2008), pp. 1509-1519.

     

    1. B.I. Campbell, P.M. La Bounty, M. Roberts. The Ergogenic Potential of Arginine. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 1 (2) (2004), pp. 35-38.
  • 4 Ingredients That Will Boost Your Strength Gains

    It doesn’t matter if you want to build huge muscles, lose excess body fat, or increase your performance, when it comes to strength, everyone can benefit.

     

    Building strength isn’t just about being able to lift a lot of weight. It means being able to support yourself in a functional way. Building strength can happen at any point in life but the earlier you start, the better your chances of having an easier time in old age.

     

    Strength is built in the gym and in the kitchen. A healthy diet is key to recovery and growth. The role of supplements can play an equally important role when used in conjunction with a nutritious meal plan. There are four ingredients in particular that have been scientifically shown to promote strength gains.

     

    Let’s take a look at the top 4 ingredients that will boost your strength.

     

    Whey Protein

    First and foremost is a fitness staple: whey protein.

     

    The reason whey protein is so popular in the fitness arena is because of its proven benefits. It has been shown to boost recovery, protect muscle from breakdown, support lean tissue growth, and promote strength gains.

     

    Whey protein is able to enhance your strength because it contains the very building blocks of muscle tissue: amino acids. Amino acids are quick to repair and rebuild. The end result is more muscle and more strength. (1-5)

     

    Creatine

    Creatine Monohydrate is our second choice for ideal strength boosting ingredients. Once ingested, creatine is broken down into a usable form of energy known as adenosine triphosphate; more commonly referred to as ATP. This is the preferred source of fuel for your muscles during a workout. When you supplement with creatine on a daily basis, you may be able to increase your workout performance and intra-workout strength, especially during lifts. (6-7)

     

    BCAAs

    Branched Chain Amino Acids are the end product of protein digestion. Why would you want to use whey protein AND amino acids?

     

    Whey protein is an ideal strength builder that you can take throughout the day, especially following your workout. BCAAs are equally as effective but they can be taken at different intervals. BCAAs are ideal as an intra-workout supplement to boost strength. Can you imagine trying to work out while drinking a full protein shake? BCAAs are an ideal low calorie, high octane option.

     

    What’s more, BCAAs also allow you to follow an intermittent fasting regiment without the worry of protein breakdown. Just like protein, BCAAs support anabolism, recovery, and strength. (1-5)

     

    Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT)

    One of the major things that could be stopping you from achieving the amount of strength that you want is inflammation. After a workout, you’re sore and unable to perform at the same intensity as the day before. Sure, this is a sign of doing great work in the weight room but it is also limiting you.

     

    Medium Chain Triglycerides, more commonly called MCT, can help to alleviate inflammation so you’re able to get yourself back in the gym sooner. (8)

     

    Make Your Own Strength Supplement

    You know exactly what ingredients you need to enhance your strength so why bother looking through hundreds of supplements when you can make your own?

     

    With the Amino Z Supplement Builder, you’re able to hand select the ingredients you want at the dosages you want. No more struggling to find the perfect supplement. Make your own supplement today with the Amino Z Supplement Builder.

     

    References

    1. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.

     

    1. Norton, Layne, Layman, Donald. Leucine Regulates Translation Initiation of Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle after Exercise. J. Nutr. February 2006 vol. 136 no. 2 533S-537S.

     

    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.

     

    1. Mourier A, Bigard AX, de Kerviler E, Roger B, Legrand H, Guezennec CY. Combined effects of caloric restriction and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on body composition and exercise performance in elite wrestlers. Int J Sports Med. 1997 Jan;18(1):47-55.

     

    1. De Lorenzo A, Petroni ML, Masala S, Melchiorri G, Pietrantuono M, Perriello G, Andreoli A. Effect of acute and chronic branched-chain amino acids on energy metabolism and muscle performance. Diabetes Nutr Metab. 2003 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):291-7.

     

    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.

     

    1. Robert Cooper, Fernando Naclerio, Judith Allgrove, and Alfonso Jimenez. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012; 9: 33. Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-33.

     

    1. Mercola, Dr. Joseph. “The Anti-Cancer, Fat-Burning Ingredient That's Even More Powerful than Coconut Oil.” Mercola.com. 22 Aug. 2016.
  • Scientific Dosages of Whey Protein, Beta Alanine, Glutamine, Creatine and D-Aspartic Acid

    When you walk through your local supplement shop, you may be surprised to find that the same ingredient can have a wildly different dosage depending on the brand.

     

    Some brands will put in less to cut cost while other brands go above and beyond ensuring to use the exact dosage you need to see results.

     

    Do you know what the ideal dosage is for your favorite supplement ingredients?

    Let’s take a look at the top 5 most popular supplement ingredients and the scientifically proven dosage for each.

     

    How Much Whey Protein Should You Use?

    Hands down, the staple of the supplement industry, whey protein offers a variety of benefits. It offers muscle protection from breakdown, increased lean tissue growth, and supports recovery. It is also one of the most debated supplements for an appropriate dosage. (1-5)

     

    The amount of whey protein you should use depends on what your goals are. On a daily basis, if your goals are muscle growth and promoting anabolic environment, you’ll want to use a whey protein twice per day. The amount per serving should be between 25 and 30 grams of protein. This will vary by brand so you’ll have to adjust accordingly.

     

    Per serving: 25 to 30 grams

    How often: Daily

     

    How Much Beta Alanine Should You Use?

    Found in nearly every pre-workout on the market, Beta Alanine is an amino acid that helps to support intra-workout performance along with recovery. Its most notable feature is that flushed feeling you get in your neck and face when taking it. (6-8)

     

    The industry standard for Beta Alanine is 1,200 mg (1.2 grams) per day, typically taken pre-workout. Depending on your bodyweight, activity level, and goals, you can take up to 2,000 mg (2 grams) per day to support performance and recovery.

     

    Per serving: 1,200 mg (1.2 grams) – Up to 2,000 mg (2 grams)

    How often: Daily

     

    Why settle for under-dosed supplements? Try the Amino Z Supplement Builder and create your own supplements with the perfect dosage per serving.

    How Much Glutamine Should You Use?

    Glutamine, considered the counterpart to Creatine, is one of the most effective and popular supplement ingredients for sports recovery and promoting lean muscle gains. It’s also used to alleviate stomach inflammation, which is great news if you have a sensitive stomach. (9-10)

     

    For the average person, you can supplement with 5,000 mg (5 grams) of Glutamine per day. Again, based on your bodyweight, goals, and activity level, it is safe to increase that amount to 10,000 mg (10 grams per day).

     

    Per serving: 5,000 mg (5 grams) – Tolerable up to 10,000 mg (10 grams)

    How often: Daily

     

    How Much Creatine Should You Use?

    Famously used by the bodybuilding crowd long before it hit the general market, Creatine is one of the best pre-, intra-, and post-workout supplements you can use. It directly supports energy production for muscle tissue, sports performance, and boosts recovery. (11-12)

     

    Studies show that 5 grams of Creatine is the industry standard but it is tolerable up to 20 grams per day during a loading cycle of 7 to 14 days. Although studies have demonstrated the safety of Creatine over the long term, you still may want to cycle off of it after one month of consistent use.

     

    Per serving: 5,000 mg (5 grams) – Tolerable up to 20,000 mg (20 grams)

    How often: Daily – May require an off-cycle after one month of consistent use

     

    How Much D-Aspartic Acid Should You Use?

    Finally, we have one of the best all-around fitness supplements. D-Aspartic Acid may be able to amplify testosterone levels in men while supporting strength, lean muscle, and performance. This is, without a doubt, one of the most common under-dosed supplements out there.  (13-14)

     

    3,000 mg of D-Aspartic Acid is the industry standard but it’s not always easy to find a supplement with this amount. For men looking to increase their testosterone levels, you’ll take 3 grams twice per day.

     

    Per serving: 3,000 mg (3 grams) – Up to 6,000 mg (6 grams) for men wanting to increase testosterone levels

    How often: Daily

     

    Conclusion

    There’s no reason to take a chance on getting under-dosed supplements. You can ensure you get the right supplement with the correct dosage every time by using the Amino Z Supplement Builder.

     

    Build your very own supplement today!

    References

    1. Tsutsumi R, Tsutsumi YM. Peptides and proteins in whey and their benefits for human health. Austin J Nutri Food Sci 2014;1(1): 1002.
    1. Phillips, S. M., and L. J. Van. "Dietary Protein for Athletes: From Requirements to Optimum Adaptation." Journal of Sports Sciences. U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2011. Web.
    1. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan; 136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.
    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.
    1. De Lorenzo A, Petroni ML, Masala S, Melchiorri G, Pietrantuono M, Perriello G, Andreoli A. Effect of acute and chronic branched-chain amino acids on energy metabolism and muscle performance. Diabetes Nutr Metab. 2003 Oct-Dec;16(5-6):291-7.
    1. Hobson RM, Saunders B, Ball G, Harris RC, Sale C. Effects of ?-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis. Amino Acids. 2012 Jul;43(1):25-37. doi: 10.1007/s00726-011-1200-z. Epub 2012 Jan 24.
    1. Artioli GG, Gualano B, Smith A, Stout J, Lancha AH Jr. Role of beta-alanine supplementation on muscle carnosine and exercise performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Jun;42(6):1162-73. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181c74e38.
    1. Hoffman J, Ratamess N, Kang J, Mangine G, Faigenbaum A, Stout J. (2006) Effect of Creatine and Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Performance and Endocrine Responses in Strength/Power Athletes. IJSNEM, 16(4).
    1. Gleeson M. Dosing and efficacy of glutamine supplementation in human exercise and sport training. J Nutr. 2008 Oct;138(10):2045S-2049S.
    1. Legault Z, Bagnall N, Kimmerly DS. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2015 Oct;25(5):417-26. doi: 10.1123/ijsnem.2014-0209. Epub 2015 Mar 26.
    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.
    1. Robert Cooper, Fernando Naclerio, Judith Allgrove, and Alfonso Jimenez. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012; 9: 33. Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-33.
    1. Topo E, Soricelli A, D'Aniello A, Ronsini S, D'Aniello G. The role and molecular mechanism of D-aspartic acid in the release and synthesis of LH and testosterone in humans and rats. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009 Oct 27;7:120. doi: 10.1186/1477-7827-7-120.
    1. Spillane M, Schwarz N, Leddy S, Correa T, Minter M, Longoria V, Willoughby DS. Effects of 28 days of resistance exercise while consuming commercially available pre- and post-workout supplements, NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of protein synthesis, and clinical safety markers in males. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2011 Nov 3;8:78. doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-78.
  • BSN Rebuild Edge vs. BSN Amino X Edge

    A post-workout supplement is one of the best ways to improve your performance while assisting in overall muscle recovery. Taking the right nutrients after demanding exercise helps to replenish muscle glycogen levels, increases protein synthesis and protects from the breakdown of muscle. After an intense workout, the body is exhausted and these post-workout supplements may help to invigorate the body as well as aid in the muscle building and recovery process.

     

    Let’s take a look at two of the best post-workout supplements from BSN (BSN Rebuild Edge and BSN Amino X Edge) to see which is superior to helping you achieve your fitness goals.

     

    BSN Rebuild Edge

    Where can I buy it?

     

    Pros of BSN Rebuild Edge:

    BSN Rebuild Edge aims to support your performance goals by increasing strength and improving muscle-building. The one feature about Rebuild Edge that really got our attention was the Myogenic Matrix which features 5.5 grams of a creatine blend. Creatine helps to replenish ATP stores and has been shown to be effective at promoting post-workout recovery. In this blend, you get the following four types of creatine:

     

    • Creatine Monohydrate
    • Creatine Hydrochloride (Patented C-HCl™)
    • Magnesium Creatine Chelate (Creatine MagnaPower®)
    • Creatine Anhydrous (1-2)

     

    Rebuild Edge also features a solid line-up of 4 grams of BCAAs and 25 mg of ActiGin, which is Panax notoginseng. Overall, this is a perfect post-workout supplement to use on the way home from the gym.

     

    Cons of BSN Rebuild Edge:

    What negative thing can you really say about such a structured and open label post-workout supplement? Sure, we would have liked to have seen the BCAA dose at 8 or 9 grams but 5 grams is the industry standard.

     

    Aside from that, the only other things that may be problematic are the artificial sweeteners, which are nearly impossible to avoid in this industry.

     

    BSN Amino X Edge

    Where can I buy it?

     

    Pros of BSN Amino X Edge

    BSN Amino X Edge is hands down one of the best amino acid supplements that we have seen come across our site. Amino X Edge has the central aim of boosting your recovery in order to maximize performance. Plain and simple.

     

    Sure, it has the standard blend of post-workout electrolytes but it’s so much more than that. You get 10 grams of muscle building amino acids! Amino acids are the very building blocks of muscle so ensuring that your muscles have them immediately after a workout is critical. (3-5)

     

    Aside from that, you can a revolutionary line-up of nootropics and energy boosters including Caffeine Anhydrous, Longan Extract, and Lindera Extract.

     

    Cons of BSN Amino X Edge

    The only issue with Amino X Edge involves the timing of your post-workout nutrition. If you are a nighttime lifter, then you may have an issue with the nootropic and energy blend. For those who work out in the morning or afternoon, you’ll be fine.

     

    Which Supplement Should You Choose

    Both of them are equally great supplements and both work effectively to improve the body’s performance as well as assist in the recovery process. The deal breaker for us would be WHEN you work out. As we mentioned above, if you’re a night owl, it’s best to go with BSN Rebuild Edge because it doesn’t contain any stimulants or energy boosters.

     

    The best thing to do is both of them and see which one works better for you. This would be especially useful if you are someone who performs doubles, or exercises twice a day.

     

     

    REFERENCES

    1. Kreider RB. Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Mol Cell Biochem. 2003 Feb;244(1-2):89-94.
    2. Robert Cooper, Fernando Naclerio, Judith Allgrove, and Alfonso Jimenez. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012; 9: 33. Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-33.
    3. Blomstrand E, Eliasson J, Karlsson HK, Köhnke R. Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1 Suppl):269S-73S.
    1. Norton, Layne, Layman, Donald. Leucine Regulates Translation Initiation of Protein Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle after Exercise. J. Nutr. February 2006 vol. 136 no. 2 533S-537S.
    1. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle recovery and the immune system. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Sep;48(3):347-51.
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