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Tag Archives: benefits of agmatine

  • Boost Nitric Oxide, Build Muscle: Benefits of Agmatine

    Amino acids have become commonplace in the world of fitness supplements and with good reason: science has been revealing incredible benefits that positively impact life at home and in the gym.

     

    Agmatine sulfate is one such supplement. It is derived from the amino acid, L-Arginine, and it can be found in a variety of fitness supplements that support everything from your workout performance to your post-workout recovery.

     

    If you haven’t started using agmatine sulfate to support your workout goals, now is the time to start. Let’s take a look at the benefits of agmatine sulfate and how it can help you achieve your muscle building, weight loss, and performance driven goals.

     

    Agmatine Sulfate and Nitric Oxide

    Have you ever been working out, pushing your muscles past the point of fatigue, and you feel the muscle pumping up? This tight expanding feeling where you swear you can feel the blood pooling into the muscle is amplified when you have higher levels of nitric oxide in the body. When your goals are building bigger muscles or increasing muscular endurance, this pumped up feeling is what you strive for time and time again.

     

    Studies suggest that agmatine sulfate may be able to support nitric oxide production in the body. While it’s strong on its own, agmatine sulfate is far more effective when combined with other nitric oxide boosters including beta alanine and L-arginine. (1-3)

     

    Looking for an effective nitric oxide boosting supplement? Why not make your own? Now you can with the Amino Z Supplement Builder.

     

    Inflammation and Agmatine Sulfate

    If you’ve ever woke up sore after a workout, you know all too well about inflammation. This post-workout inflammation and accompanying soreness can limit your range of motion while keeping you from performing at your peak level. Aside from moving through a series of active stretches, you can also help to alleviate this inflammation by supplementing with agmatine sulfate.

     

    A review published in the Journal of Medicinal Food demonstrated that not only is agmatine sulfate safe but it may also be an effective way to reduce inflammation and the pain related to it. (1-3)

     

    Soreness, Pain, and Agmatine Sulfate

    Continuing with the idea above, inflammation can trigger varying levels of pain and soreness throughout the body. If you’re suffering from inflammation that’s not related to exercise, agmatine sulfate may be able to help.

     

    Studies suggest that agmatine sulfate can provide a degree of relief from common pain episodes such as with the lower back. What’s more, agmatine sulfate has been suggested to be a useful anti-stimulant, providing a feel of calm in response to environmental stressors such as pain. (1-3)

     

    How Much Agmatine Should You Use?

    Since many supplements containing agmatine sulfate provide less than the recommended dosage per serving, we want to make sure you know exactly what to look for when purchasing agmatine sulfate.

     

    It’s recommended to use 700 mg of agmatine sulfate to maximize the benefits mentioned above; however, if you’re a very active person then you’ll want to increase this dosage to 1 gram (1,000 mg).

     

    Looking for a high quality agmatine sulfate supplement? Why not create your own at the dosage level you need with the Amino Z Supplement Builder? Create your supplement masterpiece today and reach success faster!

     

    References

    1. Gilad GM, Gilad VH. Long-term (5 years), high daily dosage of dietary agmatine--evidence of safety: a case report. J Med Food. 2014 Nov;17(11):1256-9. doi: 10.1089/jmf.2014.0026. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

     

    1. Aggarwal S, Shavalian B, Kim E, Rawls SM. Agmatine enhances cannabinoid action in the hot-plate assay of thermal nociception. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2009 Oct;93(4):426-32. doi: 10.1016/j.pbb.2009.06.004. Epub 2009 Jun 16.

     

    1. Galea, E et al. “Inhibition of Mammalian Nitric Oxide Synthases by Agmatine, an Endogenous Polyamine Formed by Decarboxylation of Arginine.” Biochemical Journal 316.Pt 1 (1996): 247–249. Print.
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