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Weight Loss

  • The best Russian training secrets: 5 Kettlebell exercises to get ripped!

    Simple old-school Russian training is making a come back. This ultimate workout focuses on the core and posterior chain. That includes the hamstrings, glutes, lower and upper back. The shoulders, calves, and entire core work as stabilizers throughout the movement. With one or two moderately weight kettlebells, you'll be amazed at the workout you can get!

    Imaging a wrecking ball. The principle with a kettle bell is generally the same. The force of the action comes from the base of the structure and not the lever (arms). The ball is attached to a chain (arms), which is attached to the machine. With the hips snapping to apply force, the kettlebell responds. There are several basic movements which you can use. This is ideal for those looking to improve overall fitness, muscle coordination, strength and condition of the back and core, and as a way to break up a typical workout once per week without resting! 2-arm swing: the Classic beginner movement Using two hands on the kb, let your hips fall back. Remember to keep your back in a tight straight line. Create a forward momentum on the bell by snapping your hips back into full extension. Remember not to hyperextend your back or hips during this movement. Try not to "dip" into a quarter or half squat. 1-arm swing: Classic Russian swing Start with the right side or your dominant arm to get comfortable swinging with one arm. Remember to hold on tight! Keep the other arm up at your side. Avoid twisting at your hips. Be sure to keep the kb moving down your center line, not to one side or the other. 1-Arm Clean If you are familiar with a clean, then you'll know where we want this one to finish. At the top of the swing, pull the kb in towards your upper chest. At the same moment, "catch" the bell with your arm, using the top of your elbow and forearm. Confused? Check out the video! Loop each clean by dropping the bell quickly into it's original swing path. You'll have to work on coordination with a lighter kettlebell before this becomes comfortable and natural. The Windmill Ideal for those with poor flexibility and weak abdominals. 10 of these beats 100 sit ups any day! With the kb in a fully extended position, keep your knuckles facing the ceiling. Reach out with the other arm for balance. Place your feet comfortably apart, then point your toes away from the arm with the kb. (If your right arm is in use, you'll be dipping to the left, so point your feet that way!) keep the elbow locked and slowly reach towards your opposite foot. Keep your eyes on the bell! Snatch Getting used to the kb snatch takes time. Starting with a classic 1-arm swing, the bell finishes fully extended, overhead. It should be resting on the back of the wrist, having flipped around at the last moment. Use a powerful high pull on the kb during the swing. In one sweeping motion: - Pull the elbow to bring the kb towards the side of the head - Open up the hand and elbow, extending the kb upwards - Allow your hand to travel the handle, placing the bell portion on the back of the wrist Pause for a moment at the top of the snatch as the kb stops its flight. Then resume the entire swing from the very top position again! Use these techniques to perfect your strength and conditioning. Expect a stronger back, glutes, hamstrings, and a tighter, stronger shoulder girdle. Master each technique with the help of my video examples!

  • Aspartame

    Aspartame (additive no. 951) is a non-nutritious, low calorie artificial sweetener used in over 6000 food products. It is commonly found in diet sodas, Equal®, sweetened low fat yogurt, sugar free deserts, some condiments, certain sweets and sugar-free gums. The use of aspartame is approved by the US (FDA), European Union (EFSA) and Australia/New Zealand (FSANZ) food safety authorities and is considered safe for human consumption by over 90 countries in the world (Acceptable daily intake at up to 40mg/kg/day of body weight as of 2006).

    A survey conducted by the Cancer Council of Australia in 2003 found that most Australians consume 6-15% of the established acceptable daily intake of aspartame per day, which was well below the level where adverse health effect could occur. To put this into perspective, Diet Coke contains around 0.52mg/mL of aspartame. This means, a 60kg person would need to drink around 4.6L of Diet Coke per day to reach the upper limit of the acceptable daily intake for aspartame. If you prefer Coke Zero, which contains approximately 0.24mg/mL aspartame, then one 60kg will have to drink 10L of that stuff a day to be considered unsafe. That is quite a lot of liquid and it's very unlikely for anyone to consume that much fluid in a day.

    What was generally agreed on by most food safety governing bodies, is that aspartame, even though can be damaging to human health when consumed in high doses, is safe for normal human consumption as the average aspartame ingested daily per person falls well within the upper limit of its acceptable daily intake quantity. That sounds quite harmless, I mean, too much of anything can be damaging to health, even drinking too much water can cause hypernatremia (water intoxication) and may potentially lead to death, no kidding. So where did all these controversies surrounding aspartame come from?

    Historically, there has always been controversy surrounding the use of aspartame, the head of FDA was fired in 1981, allegedly after refusing to approve the legalization of aspartame (Cancer Council of Western Australia, 2010, accessed on 10th December 2012). Since the legalization of aspartame, there have been a number of reviews by food safety authorities over the safety of its consumption, and each time the reviewing organization maintained the position that aspartame is safe for human consumption.

    The most recent controversy over the safety of aspartame consumption that lead to a new round of reviewing and re-evaluation appeared to sprung from 2 independent studies published in 2010. One study investigated the long-term carcinogenic (cancer causing) effects of aspartame in mice (Soffritti et al. 2010, American Journal of Industrial Nutrition) and concluded that the life-long consumption of aspartame can result in liver and lung cancers in the mice tested. The other study analysed 59,334 Danish pregnant women and made the association between artificially sweetened soft drink intake and the increased risk for preterm delivery (Halldorsson et al. 2010, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition). In response, the EFSA conducted scientific evaluations on the above 2 studies and released its statement on February 2011. In the statement, EFTA pointed out the fatal experimental design flaws of both studies mentioned above, and rightfully concluded that neither provide sufficient evidence to demonstrate that aspartame is carcinogenic or can increase the risk of preterm delivery. Based on available scientific evidence at the time, the EFTA stated that aspartame is safe for human consumption.

    A number of studies regarding to the safety of consuming aspartame has been published since EFTA statement on February 2011. Below are snippets of some of the scientific literatures available since 2011 regarding the safety of aspartame:

    • It was found that the consumption of equal or greater than 1 daily serving of diet soda can slightly increase the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma in men but not in women compared to those compared to caloric sugar-sweetened soda, the author concluded that the study results indicated the "possibility" of a detrimental effect of aspartame on the risk of cancers tested (Schernhammer et al, 2012, American Journal of Nutrition).
    • A study found that the long-term consumption of aspartame can lead to an imbalance of antioxidants and pro-oxidant status in the brain in rats (Abhilash et al, 2012, Drug and Chemical Toxicology).
    • Chronic exposure of aspartame can result in detectable methanol in blood and subsequently induces oxidative stress in rat brains (Iyyaswamy and Rathinasamy 2012, Journal of Biosciences).
    • A medical case report found that the consumption of aspartame caused systemic allergic dermatitis in a 37 year old woman (Veien and Lomholt 2012, Contact Dermatitis).

    Sound scary isn't it? Well only if the results of the studies are scientifically sound. Perhaps in response to the new studies emerged describing the possible adverse effects of consuming aspartame, on May 2011, EFTA was asked by the European Commission to conduct a full re-evaluation on the safety of aspartame. On June 2011, EFTA launched a public call for scientific data on aspartame and the re-evaluation is expected to be completed on May 2013.

    Many consume artificially sweetened food and drinks as part of their weight management regime. The intake of aspartame in place of caloric sugar does not cause weight loss if a person consumes the same amount of calories. Interestingly, it has been found that consuming aspartame without knowing can lead to reduced total calorie intake whereas knowingly ingesting aspartame can increase overall energy intake (Yang 2010, Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine). So if you want to lose weight, either ingest aspartame in place of caloric sugar without knowing it, or just simply eat healthy and restrict your overall daily energy intake. The long-term effect of artificial sweeteners on children and adolescents is unknown and its potential role in weight management in relatively unclear (Foreyt et al. 2012, The Journal of Nutrition). Additionally the American Heart Foundation and American Diabetes Foundation also issued a statement stating that there are insufficient data indicating that the use of artificial sweeteners in place of caloric sweeteners "reduced added sugars or carbohydrate intakes, or benefit appetite, energy balance, body weight, or cardiometabolic risk factors" (Gardner et al. 2012, Circulation). Thus, I suggest you to exercise caution when using artificial sweeteners such as aspartame as part of your weight management regime, until more concrete scientific data on the safety and efficacy of these sweeteners are available.

    So what's my position on aspartame? Well, I myself am guilty of consuming decent quantities of diet soda each week. After researching for this article, the can of diet soda that usually sits on the side of my computer when I'm having the writer's block was replaced by a glass of spring water. I am eager to see the final results of the EFTA re-evaluation and their soon-to-be updated recommendations regarding to aspartame consumption. Until then, I will be on an aspartame elimination diet.

  • BCAAs Protein Creatine

    BCAAs Protein Creatine - How and why we stack them:

    To get your results to go from average to enhanced, you must use the right supplements as a stack. A little BCAA and a little protein will still get you results. However, big changes can come from using the right portions in a stack.


    You can always count on BCAAs for... Essentially, BCAA's are just 3 of the essential amino acids you'll need to build muscle. However, they do play the biggest role in muscle growth and reparation. If you check out the label on your protein supplement, you'll find an amino acid profile listing milligrams of amino acids in each serving. This including the BCAAs (branched chain amino acids), valine, leucine and isoleucine. Protein synthesis occurs when there is both muscle energy (ATP) and bcaas ready and available. The muscle cells are then well equipped with enough energy to actually synthesize more protein, which is just what we want. Keeping your ATP level up will be hugely impacted by diet. We don't want to minimize the very important role that natural, whole foods play in your results. These stacks will simply play a fill- in role when something is missing! As mentioned before, most protein supplements do have small doses of bcaa's. We prefer a stand-alone BCAA supplement because it offers a targeted, concentrated version to be delivered directly to your muscles. You can take this throughout the day in smaller doses to keep your bcaa level up (particularly leucine) and keep the body actively synthesizing protein. Stacking BCAAs with Whey Whey protein isolate or concentrate is perfect for the post workout phase because it delivers a wide variety of amino acids at a rapid rate to the whole body. These are needed not just in the muscles, but also the tendons, ligaments, bone structure and other connective tissue to keep it recovering effectively. Stacking BCAAs with Creatine Since creatine is a non-essential amino acid, it means it is already produced by the body. As a result, your stack should be short term when adding creatine to the mix. A 4 week cycle with creatine is more than enough to see rapid results! Creatine works by increasing the amount of ATP in the system, both directly and indirectly. As we already know, the more ATP, the more energy during workouts. Plus, more ATP means more protein synthesis. As you're likely figuring out, it works as a sort of cycle. Continuing with your solid workouts and good nutrition, you'll see accelerated results. Tips to stack successfully: - Track progress with your training journal! Jot down when you start a new supplement to know how it has effected your results. - Drink a lot of water! This is especially true when supplementing with creatine! - Stay away from sugar and processed foods to decrease bloating and insulin highs and lows! Good luck and happy training!

  • Why the Fat Burning zone is Garbage

    Have you been wasting your time worrying about targeting "the fat burning zone" during your workouts? I want you to know the truth, what all fitness gurus and personal trainers are trying to spread the news about… the fat burning zone is garbage…

    It's a classic myth. Manufacturers of aerobic equipment slap a label onto their products in a mediocre effort to help their consumers figure out how to work the machine. Unfortunately, to make a dent in your figure, you'll have to work a lot harder than they've presented to you.

    Here's why:
    - Firstly, when it comes to fat loss, diet is responsible for 80% of your results while exercise is responsible for the last 20%. That means that every moment of the 20% has to be used as efficiently as possible!

    - While your body can burn fat for energy, it is the slowest, most complex way of metabolizing energy. The "fat-burning zone" is at a low-intensity effort, and may or may not kick in after 30 minutes of exercise!

    - The body would rather use sugars/ carbs for energy. Therefore, it always depletes the available carbohydrate stores first… this can actually take over an hour to complete!

    - When the body does burn fat for energy during exercise in that low-intensity zone, it is a minute number of calories; about 0.4 kJ in 30 minutes. When 1kg of fat contains 32.2 kJ of energy…

    - By doing the simple math, one can see that this is not nearly as efficient as we want to burn fat and actually see results!

    This is how you REALY target your body fat!
    - Cut down sugars and carbohydrates from your diet. Eat only low-glycemic carbs, including nuts, whole grains and seeds.

    - Spend 20 minutes on your favourite cardio/ aerobic machine doing HIIT (high intensity interval training). Make your 20 minutes really count! Switch between 1 minute of low intensity (slow jogging or minimal resistance) and 1 minute of high intensity (running and maximal resistance).

    - Start lifting weights to get a real burn on. Your muscles use up a huge amount of energy. A comprehensive weight training program should take longer than the aerobic workout. If you are in a cutting phase, be sure to use compound body movements. Keeping sets intense enough to maintain your mass without exhausting yourself.

    - In a shorter amount of time, you'll find yourself depleted of energy. While the body has used carbs during the workout itself, it boosts the body's ability to burn fat outside of the gym.

    - Continue these workouts regularly while keeping intake of carbs lower and you've just become a daily fat-burning machine!

    Don't get caught up in the glossy idea of the easy- to - target fat burning zone. Losing fat takes hard work and discipline, but at least you've got the tools and knowhow to get it done!

  • New Non-Invasive Drug to Burn Fat Shows Promise

    A new fat-reduction drug tested on Monkeys at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center shows positive results in reducing body fat cells.
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